White, Henry Octavius

10/17/1912

HENRY OCTAVIUS WHITE
June 8, 1840 - 1912
 
Rev. Henry Octavius White was born June 8, 1840, at Franklin, Tenn. He was born again into the kingdom and patience of our Lord Jesus Christ September 10, 1856; given license as an exhorter May 15, 1858; and received his credentials as a preacher on the 6th day of August during the following year.
He joined the Louisiana Conference at its regular session in 1860. He was married in 1868 to Miss Eliza Robinet, who shared with him the duties and labors of an extended itinerant life, and together they reared a large family. His devoted wife and children mourn their loss, yet this is softened by the assured hope of reunion in the eternal home.
The scope of his ministry is practically coextensive with the State of Louisiana of history that was replete with the inflictions of war, flood, and life history shows that he kept the faith and moved forward in and covers a period of history that was replete with the inflictions of war, flood, and pestilence. Yet his life history shows that he kept the faith and moved forward in his appointed way steadfastly-until the final call came on October 17, 1912. He received the following appointments at the hands of the chosen authorities of the Church: Sabin Circuit, 1861; Caddo Circuit, 1862; Bear Creek Circuit, 1863; Bayou Macon, 1864-65; Big Cane and Evergreen, 1866; Alexandria, 1867-68; Bossier, 1869; North Bossier, 1870-72; Minden, 1873; Trenton, 1874-76; Bastrop, 1877-78; Lake Providence, 1879-82; Baton Rouge, 1883-84; New Iberia, 1885-86; Rayne and Plaquemine Brulee, 1887; Minden, 1888-89; Arcadia, 1890; Delhi District, 1891-94; Opelousas District, 1895-98; Lake Providence, 1899-1900; Arcadia, 1901-02; Bienville, 1903-05; Columbia, 1906-09; Mangham, 1910-11. From this place, after a ministry of two months and seven days of the current Conference year, he entered into rest. He received altogether twenty-four appointments to different charges as circuit and station preacher and presiding elder.
Such a life of sacrifice and service crystallizes into its own memorial. No doubt the full-rounded voice, so often heard in earnest prayer in the council of the saints below, now joins in the praises of God above.
Source: Journal Louisiana Conference Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1912, pages 66-67 by S. J. Davis.