Foster, Hattie Theus (Mrs. John F.)

11/8/1944

HATTIE THEUS (Mrs. John F.) FOSTER
May 6, 1878 - November 8, 1944
 
Hattie Theus Foster, daughter of Maggie Virginia Brice and William P. Theus, was born near Arcadia, Louisiana, May 6, 1878. Early in her girlhood she united with the former Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and was a faithful, efficient and devoted member of the Church throughout her lifetime.
October 6, 1897, Miss Hattie Theus and the Rev. Hampton R. Singleton, a Methodist minister, were united in marriage. Three sons were born of this union: James R. Singleton, now living in Dallas, Texas; Hampton R. Singleton, Jr., now living in the Canal Z6ne; and William Brice Singleton, now residing in Dallas. Mr. Singleton served churches in Louisiana and Missouri and died in St. Louis in 1913.
Mrs. Foster in her girlhood attended Ward-Belmont, Nashville, Tennessee, where she graduated with honors. Later she continued her studies in Southern Methodist University, and was awarded the Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees. She then taught for several years in that Institution.
On February 11, 1933, she married The Reverend John F. Foster, D.D. an honored member of the Louisiana Conference. They moved to Shreveport in 1934, where Dr. John Foster joined the great majority on March 25, 1944.
Mrs. Foster transferred her membership to the First Methodist Church, Shreveport, December 9, 1934. It was a real joy to serve as her pastor. Her seat in the sanctuary was rarely vacant. She served as president of the Woman’s Society of Christian Service and as teacher of the Womans Wesley Bible Class. She was deeply interested ‘in furthering the cause of interracial understanding and good will. She assisted in establishing Vacation Bible Schools for Negro children and taught in many of those schools. She was vitally interested in youth, especially ministerial students.
In fact, no phase of the Church’s program, or the majestic marching of the Kingdom of God, lay beyond the scope of her interest. One of her last acts before going to the hospital was to mail a check to our office for The University Methodist Church and Student Center at Louisiana State University. Her interest in Christian Education, particularly the train-ing of young ministers, was further evidenced by the fact that in her will she bequeathed the sum of $6,000.00 to the Theological School of Southern Methodist University for an endowment scholarship in memory of Dr. Foster.
Her character was deepened and sweetened by a personal relationship of love and loyalty to the Master himself. Hers was a character that seemed to say in every act: “I expect to pass this way but once; any good, therefore, that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow being, let me do it now; let me not defer it or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.” It can be said of her in the Master’s own words: “She hath done what she could.”
She passed away in Shreveport on November 8, 1944, at the age of sixty-six years, six months and two days.

“I cannot say, and I will not say
That she is dead! She is just away!
With a smile of the face, and a wave of the hand,
She has wandered into an unknown land,
And left us dreaming how very fair
It needs must be as she lingers there.”

Source: Journal of the Louisiana Conference of the Methodist Church, Pages 87-88, 1944 by Dana Dawson