Midyett, Helen Hereford Nelson (Mrs. Jack)

1/1/1951

 

HELEN HEREFORD NELSON MIDYETT
(Mrs. Jack Midyett)
April 13, 1909 – November 6, 1951
 
  Mrs. Helen Hereford Nelson Midyett, the wife of Reverend Jack Holland Midyett, died in Bastrop, Louisiana, on November 6, 1951. Her funeral was held in the First Methodist Church of Bastrop, the church of which her husband was the minister. Reverend W. H. Giles conducted the service, assisted by Reverend Frank Persons, Reverend O. M. Anderson, and Reverend Jolly B. Harper. She was buried in the Memorial Park Cemetery, Monroe, Louisiana.
  Mrs. Midyett was born in Stonewall, Louisiana, April 13, 1909, the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lane Borden Nelson. It was in this community that she finished high school. Later she graduated from Mansfield Female College, an institution of the Louisiana Annual Conference of The Methodist Church. She was always proud of  M
  Reverend and Mrs. Midyett were married on December 2, 1933, after knowing each other since their childhood days. They were married in Shreveport, Louisiana, by Dr. R. E. Smith, a beloved teacher of her husband. An only son, Charles Lane, was born December 22, 1939, in Oakdale, Louisiana. Before she died she said many times, “I am not afraid to die, but I don’t want to die because I have so many thins to tell my son.” She was a devoted mother.
  Mrs. Midyett loved people. She found great pleasure in visiting with her husband. She could always make others feel at ease in her presence. She was a gracious person. Mrs. Midyett deeply wanted her husband to be a good minister. She did everything she could to help him. She was a splendid wife in the parsonage. She served with her husband in Pioneer, Oak Ridge, Oakdale, Gilbert, Rayville, and Bastrop.
  During her illness of nearly a year before her death, the radiant faith of Mrs. Midyett was a benediction to a whole congregation and community. She never lost her interest in people. Even when she was desperately ill, she was busy making a gift for a little girl and writing a letter to a little boy. She maintained her sense of humor even to the very end.
  The tributes paid to Helen Midyett, as she was spoken of, are too numerous to mention. The doctor who first told her of the disease which was to take her life said, “Mrs. Midyett accepted the word like the very wonderful person that she is.” One of her nurses said, “She was the most wonderful person I have ever known.” So “wonderful” is the word to use when thinking of Helen Midyett.
  Mrs. Midyett is survived by her husband and her son; her mother, Mrs. Julia Priest Nelson, and four sisters, Mrs. Felix Luttrell, Mrs. George Heard, Mrs. H. J. Cathey, and Mrs. Francis J. Doulong.
 
Source: Louisiana Conference Journal, 1952: P. 174                                        W.H. Giles