Pallotta, Philip

5/11/1953

PHILIP PALLOTTA
September 15, 1892 - May 11, 1953
 
Philip Pallotta was. born in Bisente, Province D. Terano, Italy on September 15th, 1892 and died in New Orleans, Louisiana, May 11th, 1953. In 1908 he came to this country and located in Chicago. Somewhere along the way in these earlier years he committed his life to Christ and heard the call to become a witness of the Lord Jesus. He attended The Moody Bible Institute and while there he met Miss Rose Billoti, a deaconess of the Methodist Episcopal Church. On Nov. 20th, 1919 they were married at her home back In Iowa. To this union four children were born: a son who died in infancy; twins, of whom one also died in infancy, leaving the daughter Miriam; and later another daughter, Priscilla. These two with their mother survive.
Brother Pailotta was ordained a Deacon in the West Wisconsin Annual Conference by Bishop Wilbur Thirkield, Sept. 11th, 1927. Shortly thereafter he transferred to Louisiana and stationed at The Church of The Redeemer in New Orleans, which church he served continuously along with other churches till the time of his death.
His was a life fully consecrated to his Lord. He was literally “on fire for God.” Day or night, in season or out of season he was ready to witness to the saving power of Christ. Brother Pallotta loved men. His genial disposition and winning smile made everyone his friend. Death marked no hesitation in the onward ness of his soul. He looked for a city with foundations, whose maker and builder was God. He entered that city early Monday morning, May 11th, and was buried next day from the Church of The Redeemer, services conducted by Dr. Virgil Morris, Dist. Supt., assisted by the writer. His remains were laid to rest in Beautiful Garden of Memories in New Orleans. 01’ Philip Pallotta we may confidently say what was said of Barnabas: “For he was a good man, full of the Holy Ghost and of faith.; and much people was added unto the Lord.”
Source: Annual of the Louisiana Conference of the Methodist Church, Pages 161, 1953 by N. H. Melbert.