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How will you behave in the world?

June 05, 2014

Reblogged from: Searchingforthinplaces

A pressing question for me is how will what you have experienced effect or affect your daily routine. Does a 10 day walk through the Spanish countryside to arrive at one of the three holiest places in the world actually make a difference? Here are the things I have learned, and hope to extend into my daily life:
Carefully watch where you go — on the pilgrimage there were times we walked on soft squishy bits, hard, wet slippery rocks, paved roads, cobbled roads, dirt roads, thin little trails. It was very important to walk with care, place each footstep with a plan. Typically, I just plod through my day, carelessly or randomly placing my feet wherever. Perhaps it is more important to put your feet with care, to know more about what you are trodding upon.
Greet all you meet — all too often in daily life I am just head down and move on. On the Camino, we said good morning, good day, hello to everyone. Granted we were trying out new language skills, but you realize the importance of making eye contact and greeting other people.
Be open to experiences — all too often we limit this to new experiences. All experience is experience, let’s open up to it. We walked, a lot. I walk all the time, every day, but this was walking that I experienced. So heads up, eyes open, look for, live in the experiences.
Remember your group — I think perhaps a problem here is that we often can’t identify our group. It was easy on the Camino, there were eight people and myself that I had to account for. When we strung out along the path and were about to make a turn, it was common for one person to stay in veiw, until the others could see the direction you were heading. I need to remember my group, let them know where I am on the journey, and let them see the direction I am headed.
Know that you can do that which you thought you could not– All too often there are complaints that others are limiting us or placing limitations on us. But often I think those are internal messages that we send to ourselves. You can do the very thing which you believe that you could not. It will take work. It will take practice. It will push you to the limits, but you have to move in that direction, no one else can do it.